Locksmith Facts

Lets take a look at a few facts.

Once a burglar has selected a home to burglarize, most will spend no more than a minute trying to break in and less than five minutes inside.

Most residential burglaries occur on the first or ground floor.

The point of entry is usually made at the rear or by a side door, the second most common access is via the garage door.

Most burglaries occur during daytime hours when homes are empty, and belong to two person households.

Now, with a few basis facts of burglary out of the way, in order to out fox a burglar, you need to think like one. Here are a few questions a burglar would ask himself before he breaks into your home. Ask this question to yourself.

If you were a burglar targeting your own home:

How would you get in to your home? Evaluate your home from the inside and out, night and day. You might even try a “mock” break-in, trying window jambs and loose locks on your house’s perimeter. Just let the neighbors know what you’re up to before you go lurking in the bushes.

If you failed your test, hear are a few thoughts to harden your residence to burglars.

Lights

Even though most burglaries occur during the day, some occur during hours of darkness. Criminals are in search of houses with no one home. To reduce your home’s risk of burglary at night, install motion lights in the front and in the rear of your house wherever possible. To be extra cautious, try to position the lights at the corners of your residence so the motion detectors can catch someone approaching from the side. Make sure the lights are positioned at a height that someone cannot disable them by easily reaching up and unscrewing the bulb.

Landscape

Make sure all shrubs and trees are trimmed back so they do not allow a burglar to conceal himself while attempting to open a window or door. If possible, plant bushes with prickly thorns around these locations. They are a cheap deterrent.

Scope out your yard

Don’t stop your security awareness at the outside walls of your house. Your yard areas (if any) also deserve attention. In general, don’t leave anything around the yard that might help a burglar get into your house. Ladders, stackable boxes or any garden tools should be put away, preferably in a locked cabinet. Many burglars have used the property owner’s own tools to break into a home. Don’t place outdoor furniture tables nearby the house. These could become an easy stepladder to the roof. To discourage potential climbers, spread grease on any metal drainpipes if they are close to windows. Use Vaseline or clear automotive grease, depending on the color of the pipe (or replace them with plastic pipe). Yes, criminals do climb up drainpipes. Think about it, most second story windows are left un-secure and make a house easy to gain entry to.

Hide your identity

Do not place your name on your mailbox or front door, especially if you are a woman. If you really have to do this, use your last name only.

Secure the windows

Though windows are relatively easy to break, the loud noise of shattering glass will deter a thief if you’re near other houses.

Create a lock for wooden-frame windows. At the top edge of the bottom frame, drill two holes perpendicular to the sash or at a slight, downward angle. Drill completely through the inside sash and halfway into the outside sash. Insert nails or bolts (don’t hammer or screw these) into the holes. To test this setup to make certain the bolts won’t pop out when wiggled.

Don’t leave windows and doors open during the night whether you’re home or away. That’s a commonsense precaution, but a surprising number of people forget to do just that, especially second story windows. It’s a good idea to make a “pane patrol” part of your ritual of leaving the house. Another option is to use a swege window alarm and stop. A swege is like a door stop for windows. It’s a device you place on windows you use for ventilation. It allows you to keep the window open (say 6-8 inches) for air. However, should anyone push the window further open the swege stops the window from sliding and emits an ear piercing alarm to scare the intruder away and to alert you of attempted entry.

Use a pickproof locking device for your windows. Make sure the frames are solid.

If you’re beyond the earshot of your neighbors, they won’t hear the glass breaking.

Consider installing a Plexiglas sheet for the more accessible windows. This will make entry through them more difficult.

Basement windows are an easy target, since they’re low and usually well hidden. Firmly wedge a steel bar across the window, or install a metal grate.

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